Why Postpartum Women should See a Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist: Part 1

Pregnancy is, in my opinion, the most beautiful experience ever. Mothers get to feel and watch their bodies change as they nourish and make room for their growing baby angel(s). A mother’s physical and mental postpartum journey is just as beautiful. While many mother’s experience complications with milk production (fed is best!), either due to prolactin hormonal complications or birth defects such as (and absolutely not limited to!) a baby’s inability to effectively and efficiently remove milk from the breasts due to a tongue and/or lip tie; there are many mothers who get to experience breastfeeding problem free. It is an incredible feeling to experience filling up with milk in response to the hormone oxytocin and then to nourish a baby angel with milk produced from one’s own body.  It is just so beautiful to experience this and the other many changes a postpartum body encounters over a long period of time. However, this beautiful journey through pregnancy, labor and delivery could also cause trauma to a woman’s postpartum body. If there is any piece of advice that I could give to a postpartum mother, it is to see a pelvic floor physical therapist at 6 weeks postpartum after every pregnancy. If you are reading this and you are 20 years postpartum, a pelvic floor therapist can still help you!

Questions to ask yourself to determine if you are experiencing symptoms from a vaginal and/or rectal prolapse:

Did I push for a long time during delivery?

Do I bleed or feel pain during or after any type of exercise?

Do I bleed or feel pain during or after intercourse?

Am I able to achieve orgasms?

Do I experience bladder incontinence or leakage during or after exercise?

Do I experience bladder incontinence or leakage while sneezing or coughing?

Am I able to hold in flatulence?

Do I feel loose down there?

Do I feel “squishy” down there?

Do I feel like I am sitting on a ball?

Questions to ask yourself to determine if you are experiencing symptoms from hip injury: 

Do my hips hurt?

Do I bleed or feel pain during or after any type of exercise?

Do I bleed or feel pain during or after intercourse?

Am I able to rotate my hips without feeling pain?

Questions to ask yourself to determine if you are experiencing symptoms from Diastasis Recti:

Does my stomach cave in?

Do I have a “baby pooch” on my stomach?

Do I have a weak transverse abdominus?

Question to ask yourself to determine if you are experiencing symptoms from spinal complications:

Does my lower back hurt?

If you answered yes to one or more of these questions, I have fantastic news! Treatment from a pelvic floor physical therapist can completely resolve some of these issues or help you learn to comfortably live with them. 

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